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Deccan Kingdoms- Bahamani and Vijayanagar

by Madugundu Krishna on 24/06/11 at 2:55 am

The Muslim ruler of Ahemednagar, Bijapur and Gol konda fought with their combined forces of the army of Vijayanagar led by its last ruler Aliya Ram raja if February 1565 near Talikot. Ram raja was defeated and killed.

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Bahamani kingdom was established in the northern Deccan during the reign of Muhammad Tughluq inn 1347 by one Zafar Khan, a brave solider. His kingdom extended from the Perganga River in the north to the Krishna in the south, with Gulbarga as its capital which was later shifted to Bihar. The kingdom lasted about 180 years. By 1527, the Bahamani kingdom was split up into five independent states, viz., Bidar, Berar, Ahemednagar, Bijapur and Gol konda. The Bahamani was constantly fighting with the neighboring Hindu kingdom of Vijayanagar which continued even after the split up and at last, in 1565, all these states combined and destroyed the Vijayanagar kingdom at the battle of Talikot.

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*The Gol Gumbaz mosque at Bijapur is a splendid mosque. The dome of this mosque is the largest in India.

The kingdom of Vijayanagar – 1336 to 1565

The kingdom Vijayanagar was Hindu kingdom in the Deccan and was situated to the south of the Bahamani kingdom from the Krishna to Cape Comorin. It was founded during the region of Muhammad Tughluq in 1336 by two Hindu brothers Harihara and Bukka.

This kingdom lasted about 200years. Vijayanagar, on the southern bank of the Tungbhadra River, was its capital. The Rajas of this kingdom were often at war with the Bahamani kingdom. The Muslim ruler of Ahemednagar, Bijapur and Gol konda fought with their combined forces of the army of Vijayanagar led by its last ruler Aliya Ram raja if February 1565 near Talikot. Ram raja was defeated and killed.

The most famous ruler of the Vijayanagar kingdom was Krishna deva Raya, the last greatest Hindu ruler of southern India (1509 to 1529) and perhaps the greatest of all south Indian rulers.

Today, nothing remains of Vijayanagar apart from the ruins of temples, palaces etc., around the small village of Hampi in Karnataka but once it was the splendid capital of a mighty empire which extended cross the whole of southern India.

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megamatt09

Jun 24th, 2011

Very interesting.

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